What Is It?

Making history in India, William Shakespeare’s first collected edition of plays is making its way to Mumbai’s Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sanghralay {CSMVS} in Fort in collaboration with British Council in India from January 20 to March 8. The name that garners excitement and unites the literature enthusiasts ironically coined the phrase ‘What’s In A Name’, also the title of the exhibition, will be displaying the gorgeous antique goatskin book with its first page of the classic tragedy, Romeo and JulietĀ at the Curator’s Gallery.

Who Is it For?

All of you literature fans out there who’ve at some point in their life acted in one of Shakespeare’s plays, or in general are a fan of the Victorian language master. Though it has been more than 400 years since the Thespian passed away, his work remains an integral part of a literature student’s life. First Folio was release seven years after Shakespeare’s death and contains 36 of 37 recognised plays, according to HT.

HT also reports, published in 1623, around 750 copies were reprinted, of which 234 were believed to have survived. Of these, The British Library holds five copies – out of which – one has been loaned to the CSMVS.

Why Should I Go?

We repeat, Shakespeare’s first collected edition of plays will be up at display for the first ever time in Mumbai. That’s a history in making, and four centuries later, you can in person see Romeo and Juliet’s first page – imagine the ecstasy of reading it out loud.

So, We’re Saying…

The colonial hangover looms in India as we write and speak the British English, especially in Mumbai, where SoBo is all about the Victorian architecture. With 2017 being the year of the UK-India year of culture, Shakespeare’s First Folio making a debut in Mumbai is only iconic and fitting. What’s in a name, you ask? We repeat – William Shakespeare….for the dramatic effect.

Where: Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Museum, Fort

When: January 19 to March 8

Entry fee: INR 70 for adults and INR 20 for children

Featured photo source: Wikimedia Commons [CC-PD]