This Nagaland Decor Label Is Weaving Stories Of Culture Through Bamboo And Cane!

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    What Makes It Awesome

    Humble, cosy and natural -- don't know about you, but this is how we'd describe the people and culture of Northeast India. Funnily, the materials they work with (in some cases eat and live in too) is also best described by these adjectives! Take for instance bamboo, cane or rattan. These all natural, humble fibres are loved and best known for their nostalgia, eco-friendly nature and ability to add warmth to a place. All that Cane Concept is doing is giving these emotions a tangible existence in their unique home decor and furniture. It's also a way of optimising these available sustainable resources and skills and keeping a dying craft alive, shares Co-Founder Aku Zeliang.

    Founded back in 1993, by his mother Jesmina Zeliang, Cane Concept, based in Nagaland, actively began building an online presence only recently (during the Covid-19 lockdowns more specifically). This has given their products the rightful exposure they deserve and in tandem helped skill and employ clusters of artisans (across Manipur, Turpury, Nagaland) that took a hit. Coming to the exciting bit -- the products and designs! On Cane Concept's line you will find handcrafted Bamboo Wall Plates, Bamboo Pendant Lights, Cane & Bamboo Trays, and Rattan Chairs.

    We love everything we see, especially the deft Basketry (think baskets of different shapes and sizes tonbe used as planters, storage boxes, fruit bowls) and the meticulous weaving technique shown across (woven with pre-dyed bamboo or cane strips; natural dyes only). Oh and the designs are inspired by the people of the various Naga tribes. Makes sense, because everything you spot is truly one-of-kind and as colourful as the people (dialects, clothes, dances, all)!

    Pro-Tip

    Prices start at INR 800 upwards. Cane Concept is also setting up centres in Nagaland to teach unemployed educated youth the dying crafts of Basketry, Textile Weaving and Pottery. Through this their hope is to keep the traditions of the Northeast alive and kicking.

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