Are you someone who cannot imagine life without those pair of jeans, the ones that you practically live in? The pair that’s lasted way longer than your last relationship {damn}, the one with the tiny hole that only you can see, a piece that’s distressed ‘cos you took a blade to it? If you have a different ‘fit’ for each of these descriptions, we’re in the same boat.

Originally used by 19th century American workers as durable clothing for hard labour, today the humble denim has found a place on international runways, given rise to dedicated labels, and morphed into a fashion essential that every fashionista worth her salt swears by.

We’re decoding some common and some not-so-common fits so you know what flatters your body type and makes your booty pop {or not}.

Straight-Leg Jeans

Photo source: H&M

Photo source: H&M

Straight leg jeans are cut in a manner that the diameter of the leg opening is almost exactly the same; right from the knee down to the ankle creating a seemingly straight vertical silhouette.

Body Type: This is the most flattering fit for all body types, including short frames, curvy, and skinny.

Get some here.

Skinny Jeans

Photo source: Myntra

Photo source: Myntra

Skinny jeans have a body-hugging fit throughout and end in a small leg opening. The tapered leg portion creates the illusion of height and cuts a slimmer figure.

Body Type: Good for both petite builds and tall frames. The ones with stretch-work well for hourglass figures too.

Get some here.

Flared Jeans/Bell Bottoms

Photo source: Asos

Photo source: Asos

Flared jeans aka bell-bottoms start flaring wide from the knees down to the hems. Modern versions are tighter fitted in the thigh and upper leg area, while earlier ones had a looser fit.

Body Type: Tall women and those with an athletic body shape can carry these off really well. They also balance out a problematic hip area.

Get some here.

Bootcut Jeans

Photo courtesy: Myntra

Photo courtesy: Myntra

These normally taper till the knee and then moderately flare out to accommodate a boot. While women’s bootcuts are tight till the knee and then flare out slightly towards the hem, men’s styles are usually loose, all the way from crotch to the hem.

Body Type: Good for top-heavy women since they draw attention away from the bust area. Leggy lassies can also rock a bootcut.

Get some here.

Drop-Crotch Jeans

Photo source: Myntra

Photo source: Myntra

Baggy, comfy, and trendy, the inseams of these jeans are lower on the legs than traditional jeans, yet still give you a fitted waist. Basically, the crotch seam is closer to the knees.

Body Type: Drop-crotch pants work in favour of pear-shaped bodies as they accentuate the waist while giving your thighs and hip ample room.

Get some here.

Boyfriend Jeans

Photo source: Myntra

Photo source: Myntra

Borrowed from the boys, the boyfriend jeans involve a slouchy, relaxed fit. They can be worn for a menswear-inspired yet feminine look.

Body Type: Their loose fit suits just about every body type, except perhaps those with shorter heights as they visibly shorten the legs a bit. If you wish to define your figure, choose a slimmer, more structured pair, but if you want to go more authentic with the look, size up and choose a baggier version.

Get some here.

Mom Jeans

Photo source: Asos

Photo source: Asos

Mom jeans refers to a style that has a high waist {rising above the belly button} and is loose-fitting, often with excess material around the crotch and legs. They are usually in a solid light blue colour with no form of washing or fading.

Body Type: Good for concealing a jelly belly and also giving slender figures some depth.

Get some here.

High-Waisted Jeans

Photo source: Asos

Photo source: Asos

This fit sits higher on the waist; some extremely high-waisted jeans fall just below the bust.  The legs can either be skinny or flared.

Body Type: Recommended for slim or hourglass shapes as this style tends to highlight the waist.

Get some here.

So there you go ladies, another reason for some good ol’ Diwali shopping! Choose wisely.

Featured photo source: Myntra