Working From Home? Here's The Right Way To Do It According To Ergonomics

One day you're working from your office desk where everything was kept in its designated spot and the next day, you're working from home due to a pandemic. And with untimely work from home measures comes backache from not having the right workspace and working hunched back on your couch like a potato. 

Thinking of changing that? Well, you should as it affects your productivity along with your body posture. Here are a few foundational tips from ergonomic experts. 

Stop Sitting

Our bodies are the happiest when we're perching. Remember the good old days when you sat on a barstool? That's perching when your spine remains in an elongated S-shape and your legs are fully stretched. If you have a high stool like that at home, use it. If not, find a place to stand and work. Perching and keeping your back straight might be tiresome at first because your spine is used to being slumped over in a C-shape, but that pain is good. 

Don't Confine Yourself To One Spot

Truth be told, offices condition you to work from sitting at one spot for endless hours but that's just another corporate imposition. You're at home, so you're free. Your body is designated to move, so have four-five different postures in your workday. Try standing, sitting cross-legged on the floor, kneeling or squatting, and lying flat on your back (while you're on calls). Have a chance to pace/walk? Take it. 

Grab Those Cords

Do you often find yourself scrambling for chargers? Even if it's a small task, on the whole, it sure doesn't feel like one because its a hindrance. Whenever you are stationary at one position, charge your devices to the maximum, so you don't have to dangle with wires while you're walking or switching positions. 

Protect Your Eyes

Position your laptop/computer at the right angle. The screen should be in a straight line with your head, and if that's not completely possible, make sure your neck in not tilting downwards to your chest. Add some height to your devices by staking it on empty boxes or get yourself a laptop stand. It's also crucial to set the brightness according to the lighting in the room, so don't put a lot of strain on your eyes and be mindful about it. 

Take A Break

Experts suggest that you take a 10-20 minute every 90 minutes. And no, this isn't the time for you to grab a snack. Do something mechanical like walking or cleaning and stretching that gives your mind and body a break. Sure, you can meal prep but don't eat just because there's nothing else to do.