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Co-creating Clothing Magic: This Sustainable Label Works With Kutch Artisans!

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Morii

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What Makes It Awesome

Just like the woods, Morii (Japanese for woods/forest), a slow fashion label from Gandhinagar, Gujarat reflects everything organic and cohesive. The charm of this brand comes not only from its earthy allure but also from the meaning it finds in co-creation, shares Founder and Textile Designer, Brinda. If sustainability and conscious design and aesthetics have piqued your interest, you must embrace and wear Morii.

Here's more context to our analogy. Brinda, worked with the marginalised craft communities of Kutch as part of a work project at the start of her career. This led to the thought of ditching in-house production to give way to co-creating with these skilled artisans and so began Morii. She conducts bimonthly basic design workshops with them. This is to support their traditional embroidery techniques and give them better direction and inspiration is all. No more than that.

There on, everything is organic. Quite literally. Handwoven cotton from a weaver family in Kutch is naturally dyed (or with eco-friendly dyes), cut into loose and simple silhouettes. These are then embellished with hand embroidered yolks/panels designed by the artisans. Morii's collections boasts of casual, timeless pieces like unisex shirts, tunics, crops, jackets straight cut pants and even sarees.

Their focus is to celebrate the garment through its fabric and minimal design. The silhouettes are simply an extension of textures and colour. Speaking of colours, they deal in deep rustic blues, reds, indigo, beige and greens. Morii also has a dapper collection of everyday shirts for men.

Pro-Tip

Prices start from INR 3,000 upwards. None of the pieces are mass produced, they are also unique in the sense no two shirts or tunics have same the same embroidery.Morii also envisions moving to the home decor and furnishings category soon. Their idea is to use the traditional embroidered panels in wall art, cushion covers and more.